Friday, June 22, 2007

Some Mexico Family History and Genealogy Websites

Last week I posted my subjective top 5 list of Mexican family history websites (see the list located on the right). I didn't give any explanation to any of the sites, and I there are plenty other websites out there. So here is a little more complete list of sites that I have found useful in doing Mexican genealogy and family history.

Getting Started, Tutorials, and Research Helps
  • http://immigrants.byu.edu
    • The best Spanish handwriting guide is now available online. This guide will familiarize you with Spanish parish records. Also includes an index of given names, surnames, abbreviations, Glossary of Spanish terms, occupations, and Racial designations
    • Cómo Empezar—the Spanish version of the How do I begin? Pamphlet published by the Family History Library
    • Research Helps (click on the Search tab, then on Research Helps)
      • Mexico Research Outline
      • Mexico: Finding the Records of Your Ancestors, part A, 1859 to Present
      • Mexico, Church and Civil Registration publications
      • Genealogical Word list and Spanish Letter Writing Guide—Glossary of common Spanish words used in Genealogy. Guide to writing a good correspondence letter in Spanish.
Maps, Gazetteers, Ecclesiastical Guides, and other Guides
  • http://www.davidrumsey.com
    • David Rumsey has approximately 16,000 historical maps and atlases for nearly every country in the World. To enter the collection make sure your pop-up blocker is turned off, and click on insight browser.
  • http://www.mapquest.com
    • A quick way to find places on a modern map. To search for foreign countries make sure you click Outside U.S. and Canada select your country and do a place search
  • http://www.maps-of-mexico.com
    • Great modern map of Mexico, but not searchable. The site is easy to use, and has great detailed maps for each Mexican state.
  • http://biblio2.colmex.mx/bibdig/dicc_cubas/base3.htm
    • Geographical Dictionary (gazetteer) written by Antonio Garcia Cubas. Combined with David Rumsey’s map collection you will be able to find nearly any place in Mexico and its political jurisdictions during the 19th century.
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico
    • Good historical information as well as municipality information. The site has great explanation of municipalities and how they are structured in Mexico.

  • http://www.cem.org.mx/
    • Official Catholic Church website for Mexico. This site will link you to the different archdioceses as well as the dioceses throughout Mexico. Some of them have websites and most of them have email, which makes contacting them faster and easier.


Emigration and Immigration

  • http://immigrants.byu.edu
    • The Immigrant Ancestors Project—this project was organized by the Center for Family History and Genealogy at Brigham Young University. Family History staff coupled with Family History students travel to European countries to identify Emigration records. Negotiations are made and the records are digitized and then extracted by volunteers from around the world. The database is free of charge, and has been extremely helpful in identifying ancestral hometowns in Spain.
  • http://genealogy.az.gov
    • Even though this site is strictly Birth (1887-1928) and Death (1878-1953) certificates for the state of Arizona they normally list places of birth in Mexico (if your ancestor was from Mexico). These certificates have been very helpful for finding immigrants hometowns in Mexico, Spain, and other countries.
  • http://www.pares.mcu.es/
    • Libros de Asientos de Pasajeros a Indias—emigration from Spain to Latin America 1500s-1700s. Spanish emigrants were supposed to leave from Seville, Spain when immigrating to the “New World.” Some of the records are indexed…all digital images are online to view, but are very hard to read.
Online Records and Databases

  • http://search.labs.familysearch.org
    • 1930 Mexican Census online – the census is not indexed, however, it is divided into municipalities and by towns within each municipality to make searching page by page very easy.
  • http://www.ancestry.com
    • Mexican Parish Records, 1751-1880—this database contains about 400,000 names. It only includes nine parishes along the U.S. and Mexican border.
    • Mexican Border Crossing Records, 1903-1957—database containing an index of aliens and some citizens crossing into the U.S. from Mexico through southwestern ports of entry along the U.S.-Mexican border. See site for more details.
    • U.S. Federal Census Records—census records can be very helpful in identifying an ancestor’s home country
    • World War I Draft Registration Cards—Give place of birth information that will help identify an ancestor’s foreign birthplace
  • http://www.familysearch.org
    • International Genealogical Index (IGI)—The extraction program of the LDS Church can be very handy. All records extracted are searchable online for free, and have proven to be big time savers. Source information is provided, and should be checked to verify, and gain further information not extracted.
    • Vital Records Index (Mexico)—also from extracted records. Like the IGI source information is provided.


Online Newsletters, Articles, Blogs, Wikis

  • http://www.somosprimos.com
    • This newsletter is great for knowing what is going on in the Hispanic community. Nearly every issue has a section dedicated to family history and a section on Mexico. Learn about new internet sites, and great genealogy insights
  • http://hispanicgenealogy.blogspot.com
    • This website publishes short articles on Hispanic genealogy, research tips, and links to many helpful websites.
  • http://mexicoigibatchnumbers.wetpaint.com
    • Website that anyone can use and/or contribute to. The site is designed to be a research aide for anyone using the IGI on familysearch.org. If you have helpful information please add it to the site.
Portals for Hispanic Genealogy

  • http://hispanicgenealogy.blogspot.com
    • Check out the archive and also the links listed down the right side. The site highlights and links out to many helpful websites for accomplishing your Hispanic family history goals.
  • http://www.elanillo.com
    • Site is great for finding archives in Hispanic countries. The site can be a little confusing, but has good information.
  • http://www.cyndislist.com/hispanic.htm
    • Cyndi has dedicated a portion of her site to Hispanic and Latin American family history. Browse through the websites and determine which ones are the best for you.
  • http://www.google.com
    • The best place on the internet to find sites on specific countries. If you need a little extra help you might want to try http://www.chacha.com
Online Catalogs and Archival Guides, and Archives

  • http://www.familysearch.org
    • The Family History Library Catalog (FHLC) is the gateway to the Famiy History Library’s record collection. The best way to search the catalog is to do a ‘Place Search’
  • http://www.agn.gob.mx/guiageneral/
    • Mexico National Archives website. The new archival guide is nice, but can be difficult to use. Many records have been extracted / indexed and can be searched on the site. Use the helps and guides to learn how to use the site effectively.

Societies and Groups

  • http://www.genealogia.org.mx
    • Site is in Spanish, and considers itself the “portal más importante de información genealógica y de historia familiar de México (should also go in the portals section).” You will find books for sale, forums, and a lot of other great information.
  • http://nuestrosranchos.com
    • Genealogy research group for Zacatecas, Jalisco, and Aguascalientes. You must register on the site to use it (free registration), and you must prove that your ancestors came from one of these three states.
  • http://www.hispagen.es
    • IGI (FamilySearch) batch numbers organized from this site. The site has a link for Mexico, but no batch numbers have been listed for Mexico yet, but they will come. If you are interested you can find batch numbers for Spain, Argentina, Peru, Uruguay, and Chile.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Lynn,
Thanks for posting these resources.

N.C. Coleman
Member: Nuestros Ranchos Group

Lynn Turner, AG said...

I'm glad that you find the sites as useful as I have...thanks for leaving the first comment on my blog!! You should get a prize or something.

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